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What unique aspects of a neurology subject population make enrollment/recruitment/retention particularly difficult?

Q&A with Rebecca Hinton, Clinical Project & Safety Manager at genae Americas

Q: ​​​​​​​What unique aspects of a neurology subject population make enrollment/recruitment/retention particularly difficult?

A: We have had the pleasure of working with a variety of neurological clinical indications, such as stroke, symptomatic neuroma, and intracranial hemorrhage. Each have their own unique aspects that can make recruitment a challenge.

For example, Seasonal characteristics can be a factor. Studies that involve neuropathic pain often experience slower enrollment in the summer months, when pain is improved by the warm weather.

For post-market Neurology studies, finding patients with insurers that cover the procedure can sometimes be a challenge. This can be especially relevant at VA hospitals or patients in the Medicaid or Medicare programs. 

Discover our other Q&A videos:
•  How do you go about ensuring that a site is appropriate for a neurology study?
•  Are there any specific pieces of information you would include in a site feasibility survey for a neurology trial?
•  Are there any barriers to sites getting approved in a neurology trial?
•  For neurology studies, please discuss some specific quirks or intricacies that prevent sites from meeting their enrollment targets?
•  Are there procedures specific to the conduct of a neurology trial that sponsors/principal investigators should be aware of?
•  Is there anything in the design of a neurology trial that you foresee as a source of difficulty when it comes to executing?

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